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“Cambridge Friends” (online)

"I stared at my drawing as if my gaze could bore a hole through the paper, and I continued to crayon in my Astro Turf strip of green.

The next morning, as I was stuffing my lunch box in my cubby, Emily appeared by my side..."

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“Cambridge Friends” Now Live on About Place Journal

It’s here! About Place Journal, Volume II, Issue IV, A Civil Rights Retrospective, and with it my story, “Cambridge Friends.” I am so psyched to be part of this awesome collection.

In the words of the introduction, “this issue contains challenging, provocative, compelling, and prophetic contributions in essays, poetry, lyrics, song, short fiction, photography, art, and video that reflect on a particular or general aspect of the ongoing struggle for civil rights. How far have we come as a country, and how have we regressed?”

I look forward to exploring the rich array of voices assembled in this volume, and as Michael McDermott, Managing Editor, writes, “This issue will help to inspire and direct activities to forward the struggle for social justice…working for a better future by learning and honoring our past.”

A special thanks to Editor Richard Cambridge, whose vision for this issue has been profound. To borrow a phrase he borrowed from Martin Luther King, who adapted it from a sermon given by Theodore Parker in 1853, “The moral arc of the universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Who would have thought that a suburban white chick could have anything of value to add to a conversation as critical as one about civil rights? The struggle for justice, however, belongs to us all. Click here to read “Cambridge Friends.” Peace.

“Cambridge Friends” Accepted by About Place Journal

My short story, “Cambridge Friends,” has been accepted by About Place Journal for their upcoming retrospective of the Civil Rights Movement! I can’t wait for the issue to come out, as it promises to be a crackerjack collection.

My story is fiction, but the setting is a very real place, Cambridge Friends School, in Cambridge, MA, in the early 1970’s, where I was incredibly fortunate to go to school until the 4th grade, when my family no longer qualified for financial aid. I credit much of who I am today to those crazy wonderful days in an experimental, “open structure” classroom at a time when the world was churning, and I didn’t think twice about rapping a Black Panther chant right alongside my friend, Anita, before we sat ourselves down on the rug for Quaker meeting (not to mention the fact that I was a white chick with a streak of wild and a crush on Anita’s afro).

The Black Earth Institute, the super-cool publisher of About Place Journal, is “a progressive think-tank dedicated to re-forging the links between art and spirit, earth and society. Black Earth Institute encourages awareness of the arts as a means of promoting a progressive, inclusively spiritual and environmentally aware society. The organization gathers artists and audience members to further understanding of the historical role of the artist as bringing forth wisdom from beyond the self.” 

Stay tuned for a link to the story and possible reading dates…